Posts Tagged: inference

Things in Action – Interpreting the Meanings of Things in Archaeology

The proceedings of the XII Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group Meeting held in Oulu, Finland, two years ago is now out. My contribution can be found by following this link. Advertisements

Things in Action – Interpreting the Meanings of Things in Archaeology

The proceedings of the XII Nordic Theoretical Archaeology Group Meeting held in Oulu, Finland, two years ago is now out. My contribution can be found by following this link.

Article on abduction out

My article on abductive inference in archaeology can be found in the most recent issue of Muinaistutkija (3/2013). In it I argued for the fallible and open-ended nature of archaeological epistemology. With some examples from the history of archaeology I

Article on abduction out

My article on abductive inference in archaeology can be found in the most recent issue of Muinaistutkija (3/2013). In it I argued for the fallible and open-ended nature of archaeological epistemology. With some examples from the history of archaeology I

Is the scientific paper a fraud?

Much of scientific communication takes place in scientific papers, but the scientific paper has also received a lot of critique. In 1963 Peter Medawar (1991, 228–233) wrote that the scientific paper is a fraud. Not because it contains misinformation, but

Is the scientific paper a fraud?

Much of scientific communication takes place in scientific papers, but the scientific paper has also received a lot of critique. In 1963 Peter Medawar (1991, 228–233) wrote that the scientific paper is a fraud. Not because it contains misinformation, but

Habit of acting as meaning – interpreting the meanings of things in archaeology

I dare to propose that archaeologists are slowly starting to realize that the social and the material are both aspects of the real and can not be separated. But one has to start from somewhere and what would be a

Habit of acting as meaning – interpreting the meanings of things in archaeology

I dare to propose that archaeologists are slowly starting to realize that the social and the material are both aspects of the real and can not be separated. But one has to start from somewhere and what would be a